Why Snowdon? – Part 2

Why Snowdon? – Part 2

As you might imagine with a mountain, especially with one as big as Snowdon, those who love rock climbing are going to be flocking to get vertical. The Snowdon massif (which is a collection of mountain ranges in Snowdonia) is home to many a cliff face for death defying mountaineers. The cliffs here actually are said to be the site of the first ever recorded mountain climb by priest Peter Bailey Williams and naturalist William Bingley in 1798. Bingley was searching for rare plants, which Snowden is also known for, such as the Snowdon Lily. The climbing opportunities here are broad and well known, Snowdon was even the location where climbers trained themselves ahead of their successful expedition to Everest.

For those with a fear of falling or boredom, who want to opt out from the relaxation of the train and the adrenaline of the climbing, walking is always a safe and variable third option. With a choice of several walkable paths, visitors can take a trip to the peak however they see fit. Depending on the starting elevation of each trail, the journey can be short and steep or long and steady as well as all options in between. Here you can choose to take in the wondrous surrounding scenery as well as walk the same path as many a miner of the past. Whichever route you take, the view from the top will be a worthy payoff.

Once atop of this great peak, visitors are often awestruck by the fantastic sight that is achieved from gazing back at the earth from so high up. Those lucky enough to visit on especially clear days will be able to set their eyes upon not just Wales below, but England, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Even Ireland can all be spotted from the peak. This alone makes sense why Snowden is such a popular mountain, along with the islands, lakes and unbroken views of the topography that can be s
een from this advantageous vantage point.

But this natural view isn’t the only thing that sits on the mountain. In 2009 Hafod Eryri (or the Snowdon summit visitor centre) replaced the old summit café as the highest building in Wales. Here the new and exciting building would be designed with its destination in mind, sourcing natural materials like oak and granite as its building blocks. The celebrated architects built the structure aware that it would need to withstand the intense conditions that being at the top of a cold mountain would subject it to. Thus the modern yet modest looking £8.4 million visitor centre was formed. Here those who had an exhaustive hike to the top can relax in the café and take in the views with a much needed hot drink. Those wanting to take home a sentimental souvenir can take a wander round the gift shop. All of this makes sense as to why so many make the effort to travel to the top of Wales and why so many return each year.